Erich Stolz

Building on a very successful International Management career in several corporations, Erich has concentrated on helping companies to provide the foundation to grow, turning around or restructure.  Read more...

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Friday
Dec272013

stop selling - start helping or ... create moments that matter

Stop Selling - Start Helping

Or

Create Moments that Matter

 

Being involved in sales in some capacity or another for the past 20+ years – either directly or indirectly – my experience shows that one big aspect has always been surfaced more than any other: Not too many customers want to be “sold” anything. If you push a sale upon your prospective customers, your success ratio will most likely be very low. Even the best sales presentation will not give you the success you deserve or anticipate – unless you create moments that matter.

 

Many sales people are anxiously trying to show the customers their products and services by giving a great presentation all without thinking or analyzing of how these products or services can solve the customers’ problems. These sales people just hope that their products and services is exactly what the customer wants at that moment in time. This is what we would call “Show Up and Throw Up”. You make a great sales presentation and go home without any sales orders. How effective was your work?

 

Let me paint the picture from a different perspective:

Let’s say you have an ailment and you go to a Doctor who you have not met before. Prior to you describing your symptoms, pain and ailment, the Doctor takes one look at you and writes a prescription and tells you to take the prescribed medicine and you should be fine in a few days. At this stage, the Doctor has not asked you any questions about your health issues nor about your medical history, he has not conducted any tests, he has not taken your vital signs, nor has he any ideas or clues of your current situation. I think you would agree with me: You are risking your life by taking some medicine that could harm you and that Doctor could be the subject of a malpractice lawsuit. How successful will this Doctor be? Would you go back to this Doctor?

In fact, any other Doctor will want to listen to you and why you came to see him. He will ask a lot of questions about your family history and your current health situation. He will take your vital signs. Then, the Doctor will conduct a physical exam and continue to ask more questions. He may even recommend further tests. Only when the Doctor has zoomed in on the proper diagnosis and prognosis and knows with a high degree of certainty of what your  ailments are, will he prescribe a cure for you.

Every professional sales person should take the above stated scenario to heart. First you need to ask your customer some meaningful questions, gather all the facts first, do the research prior to presenting your products and services, and then and only then can you provide a solution that is meaningful. By pursuing this approach, you ultimately show your expertise and professionalism of how you can help. Furthermore, you have now also established a much closer relationship with the customer. You will also have earned a greater amount of respect for yourself. In my experience and opinion, this is a far better “rifle approach” instead of a “shot-gun approach”.

Summary: Don’t be so anxious to make a “sale”. Rather, focus on “helping the customer solving his/her problems”. Create moments that really matter to your customer!

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